Main Banner

NEWS from the Office of the New York State Comptroller
Contact: Press Office 518-474-4015

Share

State Comptroller DiNapoli Releases Audits

September 13, 2021

New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli announced today the following audits have been issued.

Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services: Oversight of Contract Expenditures of Palladia Inc. (2020-S-5)

In 2014, OASAS entered into a five-year $45.6 million contract with Palladia, under which Palladia would provide drug and addiction treatment services. Auditors found OASAS is not effectively monitoring the expenses reported by Palladia to ensure that reimbursed claims are allowable, supported and program related. For the three fiscal years ended June 30, 2018, auditors identified $2,508,682 in costs that did not comply with the requirements for reimbursement.

Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS): Oversight of Direct Placement of Children (Follow-Up) (2021-F-6)

An audit issued in March 2020 found that OCFS did not maintain adequate oversight of direct placement to ensure that Local Departments of Social Service (Local Districts) comply with applicable laws and regulations and that children are placed in safe environments. OCFS also had not developed the same type of centralized standards, policies, or procedures for Local Districts to follow in supervising all direct placement cases as it has for similar child welfare services, such as foster care. In a follow-up, auditors determined OCFS officials have made limited progress in addressing the issues identified in the initial report.

Office of General Services (OGS): Compliance with Executive Order 95 (Open Data) (Follow-Up) (2021-F-12)

An audit released in April 2020 found OGS had taken steps to meet the requirements of EO 95; however, certain aspects of the order were not fully addressed. OGS did not identify the total population of publishable state data that it maintains. Therefore, there was limited assurance OGS provided a complete catalogue of its publishable state data or accompanying schedules for making that data public, as required. In a follow-up, auditors found OGS made limited progress in addressing the problems identified in the initial audit report.

Department of Health (DOH): Improper Fee-for-Service (FFS) Payments for Services Covered by Managed Long-Term Care (MLTC) Plans (Follow-Up) (2021-F-4)

An audit issued in January 2020 identified $16.4 million in improper Medicaid FFS payments for MLTC covered services. Of these overpayments, $15.6 million was paid because DOH did not configure eMedNY payment system edits and MLTC benefit packages correctly, so eMedNY did not identify certain services as the responsibility of the MLTC plan. The remaining $877,000 was improperly paid because, at the time eMedNY adjudicated the claim, the recipient was not enrolled in MLTC, but was retroactively enrolled at a later date. In a follow-up, auditors found DOH made some progress in addressing the problems identified in the initial audit report; however, further actions are still needed.

Homes and Community Renewal - Division of Housing and Community Renewal: Controls Over Federally Funded Programs and Maximization of Federal Funding (2020-S-48)

Generally, the division has established controls to ensure the Weatherization Assistance Program meets federal reimbursement documentation requirements and that the division receives federal reimbursements on time and in a manner that recovers all funds. However, the division lost $120,475 in federal funding during the audit period because it was not expended by program deadlines, primarily due to a decrease in production caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. As of Dec. 31, 2020, the division had until March 31, 2022 to obligate and expend $10,925,486 or it will be returned to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Public Service Commission (PSC): Enforcement of Commission Orders and Other Agreements (Follow-Up) (2021-F-5)

An audit issued in March 2020 found PSC’s Department of Public Service does not always adequately monitor compliance with order conditions – and in some cases even lacks the equipment necessary to do so. Orders are, at times, ambiguous and lack time frames for completion, interim performance measures, and consequences for non-compliance, making enforcement difficult and inconsistent. In a follow-up, auditors found department officials made significant progress in addressing the issues identified in the initial audit report.

Department of State: Compliance with Executive Order 95 (Open Data) (Follow-Up) (2021-F-11)

An audit released in April 2020 found the department had generally complied with the requirements of EO 95, incorporating compliance with EO 95 into its core business functions and continued to identify new data sets to add to Open Data. However, the department did not identify the total population of publishable State data that it maintains. Additionally, the audit found some problems with the usability of some of the department’s data sets on Open Data. In a follow-up, auditors determined the department has made progress in addressing the problems identified in the initial audit report.

Department of Taxation and Finance: Efforts to Collect Delinquent Taxes (2019-S-61)

For a significant number of the delinquent tax assessments reviewed, auditors were unable to determine, based on documentation, that the department took adequate collection actions prior to completing or closing cases for one of the five collection steps tested: using applicable search tools to identify taxpayer resources that might be pursued to satisfy the debt. Auditors recommended the department improve documentation for each relevant assessment to affirm which actions are applicable and which actions staff take in their collection activities; and take steps to ensure compliance with policies and procedures that address abatement decisions, and, when needed, document the rationale for decisions.


Track state and local government spending at Open Book New York. Under State Comptroller DiNapoli’s open data initiative, search millions of state and local government financial records, track state contracts, and find commonly requested data.