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Budget & Finances

June 2022 —

New York City’s FY 2023 Budget and April Financial Plan shows the city has benefited from stronger-than-anticipated tax collections, outsized federal grant revenue from relief programs, savings in pension contributions from extraordinary asset gains in FY 2021, and announced additional savings programs, including significant vacancy reductions. However, better-than-projected fiscal performance may be short-lived amid inflation, geopolitical tension and supply chain issues.

Budget & Finances

March 2022 —

The February Plan benefits from New York City’s continued economic resilience in 2021 and includes more proactive planning to fund budget risks and generate savings. The City is expecting to generate a surplus of $3.7 billion in fiscal year 2022 due to federal aid, better-than-projected tax revenues, and planned savings. The surplus could reach at least $4.5 billion if revenue and spending remain on their current tracks.

Budget & Finances

February 2022 —

New York City’s published financial plan includes funding for some recurring spending initiatives for only a limited period, creating additional risks to already identified budget gaps. The Office of the State Comptroller has created a tool to identify sources and uses of funds for City programs that are not fully funded during the remaining years of the City’s financial plan, through Fiscal Year 2025

Budget & Finances

December 2021 —

New York City forecasts a surplus of $965 million in the fiscal year ending in June 2022, based largely on the receipt of $750 million in unrestricted federal aid, and projects outyear gaps to drop by nearly a third from earlier estimates. Despite the positive news, the Office of the State Comptroller has identified several risks that could pose challenges to the City’s budget in the future.

Budget & Finances

August 2021 —

On June 30, 2021, New York City adopted its $98.7 billion budget for fiscal year 2022. Excluding federal aid, the City will fund about $2 billion more in spending than was planned in its proposed executive budget in April, after adjusting for surplus transfers and money set aside for reserves. 

Budget & Finances

June 2021 —

One year after COVID-19 caused the sharpest economic contraction on record and exposed New York City’s finances to substantial risks, the City’s economy and finances are on the mend, thanks largely to unprecedented federal economic stimulus for businesses and individuals, and direct federal relief to New York State, New York City and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Budget & Finances

February 2021 —

The COVID-19 pandemic ended a period of economic expansion in New York City during which new records for population, tourism, employment, and property values were achieved. As a result, City revenues grew rapidly from FY 2010 to FY 2019, enabling City spending to grow by 55 percent, nearly four times the rate of inflation, and provide a budget cushion of more than 10 percent of City-funded revenues at the start of FY 2020.

Budget & Finances

December 2020 —

The economic, social and budgetary fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City has been unprecedented, while the loss of life has been unimaginable. As we enter 2021, the pandemic remains a threat to our health and economy as we face rising case and hospitalization figures as well as renewed restrictions to manage the public health risks.

Budget & Finances

August 2020 —

The economic, social and budgetary fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic on New York City has been unprecedented, while the loss of life has been unimaginable. Restrictions put in place to slow the spread of the disease triggered a national recession. In New York City, job losses in March and April were the largest since the Great Depression.

Budget & Finances

May 2020 —

New York City has been the epicenter of the novel coronavirus pandemic in the United States. The economic, social and budgetary impacts have been unprecedented, while the loss of life has been unimaginable.

Budget & Finances

February 2020 —

On January 16, 2020, the City of New York released a four-year financial plan for fiscal years 2020 through 2024 (the “January Plan”). The January Plan reflects the strength in the local economy, which has helped fuel personal and business tax collections; new agency needs; and an expansion in the citywide savings program.

Budget & Finances

December 2019 —

On November 22, 2019, the City of New York released a revised four-year financial plan for fiscal years 2020 through 2023 (the “November Plan”). The November Plan reflects an upward revision in the City’s revenue forecast for FY 2020, increased agency spending and a citywide savings program to narrow the FY 2021 budget gap.

Budget & Finances

August 2019 —

New York City is currently experiencing the largest and longest job expansion in the post– World War II period. Since 2009, the City has added 820,400 jobs, bringing employment to a record level of 4.55 million in 2018 and reducing the annual unemployment rate to 4.1 percent, the lowest on record.

Budget & Finances

May 2019 —

On April 25, the Mayor released his executive budget for fiscal year (FY) 2020 and the associated financial plan (the “April Plan”). The FY 2020 budget totals $92.5 billion, including $68.2 billion that will be funded with locally generated revenues (i.e., City funds).

Budget & Finances

March 2019 —

New York City’s economy continues to set records, although external risks are growing. A total of 820,400 jobs were added between 2009 and 2018, the largest and longest job expansion in the post–World War II period. Employment set an annual record of 4.55 million in 2018, 721,800 higher than the prerecession level in 2008.

Budget & Finances

December 2018 —

New York City’s economy is strong and continues to set new records. It added 715,000 jobs between 2009 and 2017, the largest and longest job expansion in the post–World War II period. Employment reached a new record of 4.4 million in 2017, 615,000 higher than the prerecession peak. Although job growth has slowed, the City is still on pace to add another 72,000 jobs in 2018. The unemployment rate fell to 4 percent in October 2018, the lowest monthly rate in 42 years.

Budget & Finances

July 2018 —

New York City’s economy is strong and continues to set new records. It added 715,000 jobs between 2009 and 2017, the largest and longest job expansion in the post–World War II period. After growing by 81,000 jobs in 2017, employment reached 4.4 million, a new record and 615,000 higher than the prerecession peak. Although job growth has since slowed, the City is on pace to add more than 72,000 jobs in 2018.

Budget & Finances

June 2018 —

On April 26, 2018, the City of New York released a modification to its financial plan for FY 2018 and a new four-year financial plan (“the April Plan”) covering fiscal years 2019 through 2022. The April Plan projects a surplus of nearly $3.7 billion for FY 2018 and a balanced budget for FY 2019.

Budget & Finances

March 2018 —

New York City’s economy is strong and continues to post solid job gains. It added 715,000 jobs between 2009 and 2017, making this the largest and longest job expansion in the post–World War II period. After adding 81,000 jobs in 2017, employment reached 4.4 million, 615,000 more than the prerecession peak. More jobs were added in the boroughs outside of Manhattan than in any other expansion.

Budget & Finances

December 2017 —

On November 21, 2017, the City of New York released a modification to its four-year financial plan covering fiscal years 2018 through 2021 (“the November Plan”). The November Plan includes modest changes to the City’s revenue and expenditure forecasts for FY 2018 based on trends during the first four months of the fiscal year, a citywide savings program, and savings from better-than-expected pension fund investment earnings in FY 2017.