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Office of the New York State Comptroller’s Seal

NYS Comptroller

Thomas P. DiNapoli

Understanding Your Responsibilities

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. I’ve never been asked to keep a record of activities (ROA) before. Was I supposed to?
  2. When do I have to submit my ROA to the clerk of the governing board?
  3. What should I do if I take a two-week vacation during the three-month time period when I’m keeping a record of my work activities?
  4. I know that I cannot receive service credit for attending electoral fundraisers, but what about for other events like testimonial dinners or fundraising events for not-for-profit organizations?
  5. What should I do if, after submitting an ROA for three consecutive months, I decide that it isn’t a good representation of the time I actually work?
  6. Do I need to keep an ROA each time I begin a new term?
  7. Who can I contact if I have questions about following the regulation?
  8. I am a tax collector who works more hours from January through April than I do for the rest of the calendar year. What months should I use to complete my ROA?
 
  1. I’ve never been asked to keep a record of activities (ROA) before. Was I supposed to?

    Yes. Since 1975, Regulation 315.4 has required elected or appointed officials, who are NYSLRS members, to keep an ROA and submit it to their governing boards, unless they participate in a time-keeping system.

  2. When do I have to submit my ROA to the clerk of the governing board?

    You must complete your ROA within 150 days of the start of a new term or appointment and sign it attesting to its accuracy. Once complete, you have 30 days to submit it to the clerk. See Your Record of Activities for a schedule of ROA due dates and help determining what to do, when.

  3. What should I do if I take a two-week vacation during the three-month time period when I’m keeping a record of my work activities?

    You should extend your record by two weeks.

  4. I know that I cannot receive service credit for attending electoral fundraisers, but what about for other events like testimonial dinners or fundraising events for not-for-profit organizations?

    You may include an event on your ROA if you attend in your capacity as an elected or appointed official — not as a private citizen. For example, a testimonial dinner at which you present a formal proclamation would be considered work-related; you could include it in your ROA. However, a fundraising dinner for a not-for-profit organization on whose board you sit as a private citizen cannot be included. See the Work-Related and Non-Work-Related Activities page for more examples of what is and isn’t considered work-related.

  5. What should I do if, after submitting an ROA for three consecutive months, I decide that it isn’t a good representation of the time I actually work?

    You can submit a new ROA for a different three-month period.

  6. Do I need to keep an ROA each time I begin a new term?

    If you feel that a previous three-month ROA still represents your responsibilities and hours, you may certify that in writing. Instead of a new ROA, you would complete a Recertification of the Record of Activities (RS2419) Adobe pdf form, and submit it to your governing board within 180 days of beginning a subsequent term. An ROA can be valid for up to eight years.

  7. Who can I contact if I have questions about following the regulation?

    You can always email our Pension Integrity Bureau if you are unsure about how to correctly comply with this regulation.

  8. I am a tax collector who works more hours from January through April than I do for the rest of the calendar year. What months should I use to complete my ROA?

    If you are an employee who works all year round but has a busier season, you should keep an extended ROA. It can be up to a full year, or the ROA can, for example, cover two months during the busy season and two months of the less-busy season to get an accurate average.

(Rev. 9/19)

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